Deadliest Day in the USA

Data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) revealed the deadliest day for teens and motorists is the Fourth of July.

Data from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) revealed the deadliest day for teens and motorists is the Fourth of July.

According to the report, more than 800 people were killed on the Fourth of July from 2006-2010 and about 140 people are expected to lose their lives this Independence Day. On July 4, 2010 74 people lost their lives in Indiana as a result of car accidents.

“These tragedies are compounded by the fact that many crashes are preventable,” stated David Kaehr, Indiana state leader for Allstate. “Driver error, speeding and distractions are the main causes of crashes, and seemingly simple activities such as switching radio stations or interacting with friends can significantly impair a teen’s or adult’s ability to react quickly to changing traffic conditions.

About 49 percent of teens believe that texting is their number one distraction while driving. Although the number one cause of death for those ages 1 to 34 is car crashes, teens are four times as likely to crash.

Congress is considering Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) laws, teen driving laws, in partnership with the Highway Transportation Bill’s reauthorization. In states where these laws have been enacted, the number of car related deaths has been reduced by about 40 percent. Additionally, according to The Allstate Foundation’s License to Save report, GDL laws have the potential to save 2,000 lives and $13.6 billion annually.

“Staying focused on the road, wearing seat belts and following the speed limit and other road rules are simple steps we can all take this July Fourth to make sure that we return home safely,” said Kaehr.

For this year’s Independence Day, Allstate and The Allstate Foundation have provided helpful safety tips and resources on their website, especially for parents:

  • Talk to your teen early and often. Discuss the risks and responsibilities of driving with your child at a young age and keep talking to your teen before, during and after the licensing process.
  • Don’t rush the training process. Just because teens have a permit or license doesn’t mean they are ready for every driving condition. By easing into the training process, you’ll help ensure you and your teen will be ready for any situation.
  • Understand your state’s laws. GDL laws are minimum standards that can help keep teens safer on the road; however, the more parents are involved in their teen’s driving experience, the more likely they will be a safer driver and passenger. To help educate parents and teens about the safety measures that keep drivers protected, The Allstate Foundation created a new free Parent-Teen Driving Agreement. The agreement can help parents and their teens make safer decisions when they get behind the wheel and when they ride as passengers with their friends.
  • Practice what you preach. Be a positive role model when you’re behind the wheel. Your teen is more likely to be a calm and courteous driver, wear a seat belt and follow the rules of the road if they see you do the same.

According to the report, more than 800 people were killed on the Fourth of July from 2006-2010 and about 140 people are expected to lose their lives this Independence Day. On July 4, 2010 74 people lost their lives in Indiana as a result of car accidents.

“These tragedies are compounded by the fact that many crashes are preventable,” stated David Kaehr, Indiana state leader for Allstate. “Driver error, speeding and distractions are the main causes of crashes, and seemingly simple activities such as switching radio stations or interacting with friends can significantly impair a teen’s or adult’s ability to react quickly to changing traffic conditions.

About 49 percent of teens believe that texting is their number one distraction while driving. Although the number one cause of death for those ages 1 to 34 is car crashes, teens are four times as likely to crash.

Congress is considering Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) laws, teen driving laws, in partnership with the Highway Transportation Bill’s reauthorization. In states where these laws have been enacted, the number of car related deaths has been reduced by about 40 percent. Additionally, according to The Allstate Foundation’s License to Save report, GDL laws have the potential to save 2,000 lives and $13.6 billion annually.

“Staying focused on the road, wearing seat belts and following the speed limit and other road rules are simple steps we can all take this July Fourth to make sure that we return home safely,” said Kaehr.

For this year’s Independence Day, Allstate and The Allstate Foundation have provided helpful safety tips and resources on their website, especially for parents:

  • Talk to your teen early and often. Discuss the risks and responsibilities of driving with your child at a young age and keep talking to your teen before, during and after the licensing process.
  • Don’t rush the training process. Just because teens have a permit or license doesn’t mean they are ready for every driving condition. By easing into the training process, you’ll help ensure you and your teen will be ready for any situation.
  • Understand your state’s laws. GDL laws are minimum standards that can help keep teens safer on the road; however, the more parents are involved in their teen’s driving experience, the more likely they will be a safer driver and passenger. To help educate parents and teens about the safety measures that keep drivers protected, The Allstate Foundation created a new free Parent-Teen Driving Agreement. The agreement can help parents and their teens make safer decisions when they get behind the wheel and when they ride as passengers with their friends.
  • Practice what you preach. Be a positive role model when you’re behind the wheel. Your teen is more likely to be a calm and courteous driver, wear a seat belt and follow the rules of the road if they see you do the same.

About dbda
dbda is a corporate social responsibility consultancy embracing education and safety in the community. We are privileged to work with a large number of blue chip corporate clients, Government organisations, charitable bodies, Institutes and local authorities. We also have a network of schools, professional bodies, associations, universities and partners, with whom we regularly work in collaboration.

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