Advertising and Young People

The Advertising Standards Authority’s (ASA) report ‘Advertising and Young People’, provides an interesting insight into the views and concerns of parents, teachers and young people (aged 12-15) around the role media might play in the sexualisation and commercialisation of childhood and the potential for moral harm.

 

 

 Key findings include:

  • Parent/teacher concerns for young people included substance/alcohol misuse; peer pressure (relationships, fashion, materialism); sex (attitudes and understanding, STIs)
  • Young people’s main concerns were pressures of education; also image among peers, bullying, divorce, girls, money and puberty
  • Parents/teachers perceived advertising was less of an influence on young people than peer groups, TV and online content
  • Ads most likely to influence young people include those for alcohol, toiletries, cosmetics and entertainment
  • Young people were concerned about the violence they were exposed to in certificate 18 games and considered some online gaming ads as inappropriate
  • Young people view the purpose of advertising as making consumers want to buy the product and had no difficulty spotting examples of ads in a digital space
  • Parents/teachers considered peers, online content and music videos were key influencers of young people in relation to sexualisation; and gaming and TV programmes of greatest concern in relation to antisocial behaviour and violence.

Read the full report

Source: Advertising Standards Authority

Nicki, Business Director

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About dbda
dbda is a corporate social responsibility consultancy embracing education and safety in the community. We are privileged to work with a large number of blue chip corporate clients, Government organisations, charitable bodies, Institutes and local authorities. We also have a network of schools, professional bodies, associations, universities and partners, with whom we regularly work in collaboration.

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